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Received:October 01, 2016  Revised:January 17, 2017  Click here to download the full text
Citation of this paper:,2017..Sciences in Cold and Arid Regions,9(2):158~166.
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Author NameAffiliationE-mail
Fang Wang Key Laboratory of Eco-hydrology of Inland River Basin, Northwest Institute of Eco-Environment and Resources, CAS, Lanzhou, Gansu 730000, China;Key Laboratory of Eco-hydrology of Inland River Basin, Northwest Institute of Eco-Environment and Resources, CAS fanghappy2002@163.com 
HongLang Xiao Key Laboratory of Eco-hydrology of Inland River Basin, Northwest Institute of Eco-Environment and Resources, CAS, Lanzhou, Gansu 730000, China  
XiaoMei Peng Shaanxi University of Technology, Hanzhong, Shaanxi 723000, China  
Shang Li 
1. Key Laboratory of Eco-hydrology of Inland River Basin
, Northwest Institute of Eco-Environment and Resources, CAS, Lanzhou, Gansu 730000, China;
2. Shaanxi University of Technology
, Hanzhong, Shaanxi 723000, China
 
 
基金项目:This work was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (41401043, 91125025).
 
Abstract:Seed germination and early seedling growth are crucial stages for plant establishment. Two neutral (NaCl and Na2SO4) and two alkali (NaHCO3 and Na2CO3) salts were selected to investigate their effects on germination and recovery responses in Reaumuria soongorica. Results show that both salt types significantly reduced germination and radicle elongation. The rate of germination and emergence of R. soongorica seeds continuously decreased as salinity increased, and the time to achieve maximum germination rate was delayed. The speed of seed germination dropped rapidly as salt concentration increased. Alkaline salts restricted the germination rate of R. soongorica seeds, and stresses resulting from alkaline salts and high concentrations of neutral salts resulted in many deformed seedlings. The length of the radicle and germ decreased with increasing salt concentration, but certain concentrations of salt and increased pH promoted germ growth. The results of regression analysis show that salt concentration was the dominant factor inhibiting R. soongorica seed germination rate. Salinity, buffering capacity, and pH all affected embryo growth, but salinity had the most pronounced effect. Seed viability under highly saline conditions appears to be a better indicator of adaptation to saline environments than seed germination under saline conditions.
keywords:alkali stress  salt stress  germination  recovery  Reaumuria soongorica
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